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Verandas around the world

 

Verandas are both beautiful and practical, and they can add a lot of value to a property. But do you know just how widespread they are? Many cultures and architectural styles have used verandas not only as a stylish aesthetic feature, but also as a clever solution to housing issues that have arisen in certain places and periods.

 

In this blog post, we'll show you some popular veranda types from around the world - prepare to be inspired!

 

 

Verandas in Antebellum Architecture

One of the grandest incarnations of the veranda comes from the plantation mansions of the American South. Antebellum architecture - a recognisable variation on Greek Revival or Neoclassical architecture - can be seen in the mansions built in parts of the USA before the American Civil War.

 

Among these grand houses' most iconic features are the verandas (also known as porches). Held up by huge Greek-style columns, the veranda would often encircle the whole mansion, offering a shady sitting area - most welcome on a hot day in the Deep South!

Antebellum veranda

Antebellum mansion with veranda

 

Rather than being an addition to the home, these mansions were often constructed with a grandiose veranda built in. In fact, it was quite common for higher levels to also have verandas, providing the people upstairs with a shady outdoor retreat as well.

 

 

Creole Cottages & Townhouses

For our next inspirational veranda style, we're staying in the Southern United States, specifically Louisiana. This former French colony is home to a unique architectural style that's come to be known as French Creole architecture. Thought to combine France's architecture with the traditional homes of the Caribbean, it's a one-of-a-kind style that's hard to find elsewhere in the world.

Creole veranda

Creole townhouse with verandas on each level

 

Characterised by their 'galleries', these large verandas are typically found on every storey of the building and provide not only decoration but ventilation for the rest of the house. Compared to the Antebellum homes we've already looked at, Creole architecture uses thinner columns to hold the veranda up, and those columns are sometimes decorated with ornate iron work depicting flowers and vines. These verandas are effectively a very pretty air conditioning solution, custom-made for bustling Louisiana towns.

 

Many of these townhouses can be found in New Orleans. If you ever get a chance to wander around the city, see if you can spot any homes with these iconic verandas!

 

 

Indian & Sri Lankan Verandas

Did you know that we got the word 'veranda' from India? Thought to originate from a Hindi word borrowed from the Portuguese, the word specifically refers to the railings that sometimes enclose a veranda. In India, roofed porches can be found in both temples and traditional homes.

 

Meanwhile, Sri Lanka - the island nation just south of India - is known for colonial mansions called walauwa, which often include verandas.

Indian Walauwa veranda

Sri Lankan walauwa with veranda

 

Verandas here were used as leisure spaces where families could spend time together. As the local architecture did not include them, verandas were seen as a display of wealth, especially due to their prevalence in colonial buildings run by European powers. These verandas provide shade and shelter from Sri Lanka's tropical weather.

 

 

Asian Verandas for Australian Homes

Australians love verandas. It's thought that, when European settlers first reached Australia, their settlements were built with verandas to help them cope with the heat. Verandas are now a common feature of many Australian homes, and they come in all sorts of different styles.

 

Queenslander verandas are especially popular - this style is thought to get its inspiration from the architecture of the Far East.

Queenslander veranda

Queenslander home with veranda

 

As colonisation continued in the 19th and 20th centuries, verandas inspired by Buddhist temples became a staple of Australian architecture. This Asian influence is often ignored, but it produces some truly lovely results.

 

 

Verandas from SunSpaces

Our glass verandas combine the functionality of a traditional veranda with modern design and high-grade materials. Our verandas are ideal if you're looking to give your outdoor space a clean, contemporary look - plus a SunSpaces veranda makes the perfect venue for a summer garden party!

 

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